The way I see Starbucks "The Way I See It #183"

StarbucksI never believed it would happen to me.

Lo and behold, I actually read one of those little quotes on the back of a Starbucks cup and, instead of shrugging and drinking my drink, I actually caught myself saying, “Interesting!”

Whoa. Hold your horses. It was compelling.

No, I’m serious. I read it, and then I actually thought about it.

No, it wasn’t one of the musicians. And, actually, I misread it in a more generalized sense. And this misinterpretation made it more powerful to me.

(No doubt, people experience that selfsame kind of thing, here. I’m often more compelling when misread. Trust me.)

So if you’ve never seen The Way I See It #183, let me give you a little background. It’s from John Sweeney, author of Innovation at the Speed of Laughter. And it’s based on “improvisers.” But, as I said, I have generalized it, and to me, that made it a great deal more powerful.

Here’s my interpretation of Sweeney’s quote:

Don’t look at change as an obstacle; look at it as fuel. The next great idea lies just on the other side of change. We should be constantly asking ourselves, “What can I do to incite change?” Well?

(I’ve provided the strikethrough below which wasn’t quite legible, but I wanted you to see what I had changed.)

Improvisers d[D]on’t look at change as an obstacle; we look at it as fuel. We know that t[T]he next great idea lies just on the other side of change. We are [should be] constantly asking ourselves, “What can I do to incite change?” Well?

About Rick Turoczy

More than mildly obsessed with the Portland startup community. Editor at Silicon Florist. Cofounder and general manager at PIE. Follow me on Twitter: @turoczy
This entry was posted in Change. Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to The way I see Starbucks "The Way I See It #183"

  1. Well, all I can say is that I am living this post as well as the post from 2-14. The little company I work for is struggling through a turn around period and I found myself frustrated at the things that need to be done (I am an IT professional) and their ability to pay for it. They couldn’t see the obvious truth till I pointed it out to them: fix your infrastructure or loss of it will shut you down. If you can’t afford to do it with me on the payroll, let’s find another way.

    I essentially just proposed outsourcing my job. But it is win/win for us both! They will be able to pay for critical infrastructure fixes, I get to do the projects as a contractor.

    Change is always a walk into the unknown. Who knows how this will turn out??

  2. Rick Turoczy says:

    I’ve been meaning to comment on this. I apologize for the delay.

    Congrats on structuring the outsourcing gig! What a great way to alleviate risk on both sides of the issue.

    Now, the employer has a competent contractor that carries less risk than a full-time employee and you have the freedom to pursue additional opportunities with your time.

    Great great great. Happy to hear it.

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